“The Good-Morrow” – A poem by John Donne

The british poet John Donne (1572-1631) was one the most well known poets of the Elizabetan age. He was also a part of the the Metaphysical school of English poets. This poem takes place in the married bed. Husband and wife are awake after a night of sleep and love. Donnes message is a bit deeper than just the physical love between the married couple.

Look what is happening in the second Stanza. It starts with the line “And now good-morrow to our waking souls”…John Donne simply states that love is more than our physical bodies. We are souls as well. Pay some attention to the religious references: The story of the Seven Sleepers is present. Which function does it play here?

Themes: Love, the beloved, waking up in the morning

The Good-Morrow

I wonder, by my troth, what thou and I

Did, till we loved? Were we not weaned till then?

But sucked on country pleasures, childishly?

Or snorted we in the Seven Sleepers’ den?

’Twas so; but this, all pleasures fancies be.

If ever any beauty I did see,

Which I desired, and got, ’twas but a dream of thee.

And now good-morrow to our waking souls,

Which watch not one another out of fear;

For love, all love of other sights controls,

And makes one little room an everywhere.

Let sea-discoverers to new worlds have gone,

Let maps to other, worlds on worlds have shown,

Let us possess one world, each hath one, and is one.

My face in thine eye, thine in mine appears,

And true plain hearts do in the faces rest;

Where can we find two better hemispheres,

Without sharp north, without declining west?

Whatever dies, was not mixed equally;

If our two loves be one, or, thou and I

Love so alike, that none do slacken, none can die.

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“Love’s Philosophy” — A poem by Percy Bysshe Shelley

Here are a few lines of encouraging thoughts about love. The poet is Percy B. Shelley (4 August 1792 – 8 July 1822) who lived in the era of Romanticism. Look how he uses the theme of Nature in these few lines. The message of love, unity and comradeship can be found in the following verse: “Nothing in the world is single; All things by a law divine In one spirit meet and mingle. Why not I with thine?—”

The poem was first published by the newspaper The Indicator (1819) and in 1824 two years after Shelley’s drowning accident.

Love’s Philosophy

The fountains mingle with the river

And the rivers with the ocean,

The winds of heaven mix for ever

With a sweet emotion;

Nothing in the world is single;

All things by a law divine

In one spirit meet and mingle.

Why not I with thine?—

.

See the mountains kiss high heaven

And the waves clasp one another;

No sister-flower would be forgiven

If it disdained its brother;

And the sunlight clasps the earth

And the moonbeams kiss the sea:

What is all this sweet work worth

If thou kiss not me?

The Faëry Chasm – A Poem by William Wordsworth

This is a poem by british poet William Wordsworth (1770-1850) and once again the themes are related to Nature and in this case mythological faeries and how they reveal themselves in Nature. Where can they be found? According to the Dictionary a Chasm is a very deep, narrow opening in a rock, ice, or the ground. In Wordsworth’s poem they appear dancing as they reveal their secrets. What are their secrets? The poem mentions a Babe, a stolen flower and weed left. Pay attention to what’s happening rather what is described.

Themes: Faeries, Elves, Nature and mythological mysticism.

The Faëry Chasm

No fiction was it of the antique age:

A sky-blue stone, within this sunless cleft,

Is of the very footmarks unbereft

Which tiny Elves impressed; – on that smooth stage

Dancing with all their brilliant equipage

In secret revels – haply after theft

Of some sweet Babe – Flower stolen, and coarse Weed left

For the distracted Mother to assuage

Her grief with, as she might! – But, where, oh! where

Is traceable a vestige of the notes

That ruled those dances wild in character? –

Deep underground? Or in the upper air,

On the shrill wind of midnight? or where floats

O’er twilight fields the autumnal gossamer?

Sources

wikipedia.org

William Shakespeare – Sonett 26

Sonett 26 is a typical Shakespeare sonett and consists of three quattrains ending with a couplet. The sonett is adressed to Cupid and shows some influences from the roman poet Ovid. Love is the major theme. The rhyme scheme is as follows: abab cdcd efef gg.

Lord of my love, to whom in vassalage (a)

Thy merit hath my duty strongly knit, (b)

To thee I send this written ambassage, (a)

To witness duty, not to show my wit: (b)

Duty so great, which wit so poor as mine (c)

May make seem bare, in wanting words to show it, (d)

But that I hope some good conceit of thine (c)

In thy soul’s thought, all naked, will bestow it;(d)

Till whatsoever star that guides my moving, (e)

Points on me graciously with fair aspect,(f)

And puts apparel on my tatter’d loving,(e)

To show me worthy of thy sweet respect:(f)

Then may I dare to boast how I do love thee; (g)

Till then not show my head where thou mayst prove me.(g)

“A Red, Red Rose” a poem by Robert Burns

Are you suffering in the winter, longing for summer and bonnie lasses? Let me recommend Robert Burns (1759-1796). Besides his “Auld lang syne”, a poem “A Red, Red Rose” is among his most wellknown reads. Burns’ use of thematic isn’t a complicated one in these lines. The major theme is Love and longing. His love, a lass is compared to a red rose and common sorroundings are Nature and the storyteller himself.

O my Luve is like a red, red rose
That’s newly sprung in June;
O my Luve is like the melody
That’s sweetly played in tune.

So fair art thou, my bonnie lass,
So deep in luve am I;
And I will luve thee still, my dear,
Till a’ the seas gang dry.

Till a’ the seas gang dry, my dear,
And the rocks melt wi’ the sun;
I will love thee still, my dear,
While the sands o’ life shall run.

And fare thee weel, my only luve!
And fare thee weel awhile!
And I will come again, my luve,
Though it were ten thousand mile.

Jane Eyre (1934) – The very first movie adaption

Jane Eyre is a 1934 American romantic drama film directed by Christy Cabanne, starring Virginia Bruce and Colin Clive. It is based on the 1847 novel Jane Eyre by Charlotte Brontë, and is the first adaptation to use sound.

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Production began 17 May 1934 at General Service Studios. Adele sings the “Bridal Chorus” from the opera Lohengrin, by Richard Wagner, she also sings “My Bonnie Lies over the Ocean” which may seem a bit odd. The critic Leonard Maltin gave the film 2 stars (out of four), describing it as a “[t]hin version of the oft-filmed Bronte novel, produced by Monogram, of all studios[…] Still, it’s not uninteresting as a curio.”Produced by Ben Verschleiser and written by Adele Comandini.

Sources

Archive.org

Wikipedia.org

Charles Dickens – “A Christmas Carol” and a movie adaption from 1910

I guess you already know the story. The day before Christmas, Ebenezer Scrooge refuses to contribute to the Charity Relief Committee, and then rudely rejects his nephew Fred when he visits Scrooge in his office. When Scrooge returns home, he sees the ghost of his former business partner Jacob Marley, who warns him of the punishment he will suffer in the next life if he does not change his ways. That night, Scrooge is visited by three more spirits, who show him his past, present, and future him.

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Through the decades there has been numerous adaptions of Dicken’s famous story. A Christmas Carol was released on December 23, 1910 by the Edison Company. It was likely the first silent adaption of the story with English intertitles. Marc McDermott stars as Ebenezer Scrooge in this silent film version of Dickens’ classic ghost story, A Christmas Carol. About 10 minuets long.

Sources

archive.org
wikipedia.org